C.J. Yao by Jiwoong Seo

C.J. Yao by Jiwoong Seo

3721 represented C. J. Yao’s aim to capture the rush of hot blood and excitement from acting on impulse. Energy was the keyword of the show and the garments came across as very quirky with elements of sporty chic, transmitting the image of youth culture. Deconstructive tassels and inside-out pieces were aesthetics that the designer chose to express her desire to be different and break free. Numbers, fringes, braces and flashes of fluorescent colours were the details that enriched this collection of wearable denim and breathable, organic fabrics.
— C.J. Yao, Ludovica Tronci
C.J. Yao by Jiwoong Seo

C.J. Yao by Jiwoong Seo

A childlike sense of naiveté could be felt in the presentation room, as the fashion film showed unintentional spillages resulting from a clumsiness that was both playful and innocent. Modern asymmetrical cuts were contrasted against loose fits that were bunched with bands made up of a trio of white straps.
— Min Wu, Vivian Yeung
Teatum Jones took Leymah Gbowee’s story and put all the struggle, the passion and the humanity that characterises the story of this brave woman in their collection. Taking inspiration from simple protest outfits, the talented duo found an unexpected harmony in conflicting textures and clashing tones of white-ivory and pink-red, whilst maintaining the colour palette strictly to black, white and berry red.
— Teatum Jones, Ludovica Tronci
Clio Peppiatt by Jiwoong Seo

Clio Peppiatt by Jiwoong Seo

Edeline Lee by Irina Chira

Edeline Lee by Irina Chira

Dilara Findikoglu by Gustavo Valiente

Dilara Findikoglu by Gustavo Valiente

Edeline Lee by Irina Chira

Edeline Lee by Irina Chira

From the first glimpse into Yii’s collection, a fried egg motif on the invitation, it was clear that he was going to present a contrast to the minimalistic trends rotating the fashion circuit lately. The collection began by incorporating this playful motif against soft blue knits, with the egg diluted to straight white and yellow geometric shapes.

Cartoon illustrations, such as feet and faces, were also reduced to block patterns, and linked to the masses of colour and shape explored and wrapped around the body. Yii’s inspiration was drawn from The Little Prince, a French novella that makes insightful examinations about the human condition, yet in the guise of a children’s book. This obvious conflict threaded throughout the collection between the childhood state of adventure against the irreversibility of adulthood. This was epitomised in the brand’s slogan which was stamped on the final model: We Never Grow Up.
— Yii, Rachael Brown
Williams has made a habit of turning nostalgia into a fashion statement - personal nostalgia, that is. This was shown in the noughties over-plucked eyebrow of the front row’s youth and in the punk stripes shown in red and neon pink. If these seemed like fashion statements better left in the not-so-bygone era, that’s what made them so great. Chunky silver chokers and oversized pendant earrings mocked the punk princess theme, whilst ‘bad girl’ tags were stamped on jackets, skirts and ballet tops alike, and were made the centre of the designer’s signature once- a-season swimsuit design.

Williams consistently designs for her immediate cool all-girl gang, girls with the confidence and appeal to wear whatever they want. It was a look that isn’t going to be for everyone – but that’s half of the fun.
— Ashley Williams, Darian Nugent
Gyunel by Jiwoong Seo

Gyunel by Jiwoong Seo

A fresh spawn from the prestigious Central Saint Martins school in London, Wilson PK debuted a rather promising womenswear collection for his SS16 presentation at Vinyl Factory. PK’s Paradise Lost collection, inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy, was a delicate composition of gem stones, marble and colour to create an art deco inspired construction, whilst his models wore minimal make up followed by a sultry wet-look hairstyle.

PK has described his SS16 designs as representing his own religious beliefs in Christianity working together with the psychedelic romanticism of his work. His ability to play with nudity in this collection helped to bring these two notions together as something structured and something passionate being intertwined in a forbidden entanglement.
— Wilson PK, Savannah Small
Helen Lawrence by Gustavo Valiente

Helen Lawrence by Gustavo Valiente

Helen Lawrence by Gustavo Valiente

Helen Lawrence by Gustavo Valiente

Helen Lawrence came back for SS16 with a fourth collection that was all about an organic and considered approach to knitwear. The collection explored the themes of exposure versus concealment as well as distortion of the body and followed up as a natural progression from AW15.

Tight-fitting elastic contrasts paired with loose textured knits resulted in the binding of large shapes to the contours of the body. In this collection, Helen Lawrence also decided to experiment with textures, with knitted mesh and crochet techniques that managed to create unique textural surfaces. “It is all about shapes and organic forms and a lot about texture too,” explained the Central Saint Martins’ graduate. “We just wanted to combine all these things together and this collection turned out as a development from last season’s.” The inspiration behind the eclectic palette of colours mixed with darks came from Hans Bellimer and Francis Bacon. Overall, the collection came across as an invitation to explore and, at the same time, enjoy one’s body due to the collection’s surreal but also seductive undertone.
— Helen Lawrence, Ludovica Tronci
Markus Lupfer by Josh Eustace

Markus Lupfer by Josh Eustace

Markus Lupfer by Josh Eustace

Markus Lupfer by Josh Eustace

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Drama was the keyword with Mary Benson. For her SS16 theme, Mary Benson showed her take on heartbreak and lost love. Writing embellished the garments, reminiscent of love letters and personal diary entries, and became progressively frantic and disorderly. There was theatre, drama and surrealism in Mary Benson’s sense of romanticism, angst, and trauma. Though there were dark undertones to the collection with images of pain, like the teardrops, the overall look was kept light and feminine with summery pastels, florals, and delicate chiffons. On a closer look, you could see the conflict between Mary’s dark twisted theatrics and ultra-feminine aesthetic; floral prints showed wilting flowers and were made up of watchful eyes.

And lastly, our photographer wandered into the wrong show by accident and ended his fashion week on this bizarre sort of rock-n-roll-mayhem presentation, that we hadn’t been invited to, by Dilara Findikoglu - one of the graduates who took part in Central St. Martins’ guerilla show earlier this year.
— Mary Benson, Vivian Yeung
Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Mary Benson by Gustavo Valiente

Omer Asim by Josh Eustace

Omer Asim by Josh Eustace

Having earned a reputation for outlandishly expressive design, Pam Hogg’s collection did not disappoint. There were 4-inch metal-spiked leather shorts, eye-catching headwear and beautifully vibrant colours.

As can be expected from Pam Hogg’s loyal cult following, the audience lapped up the designs with a rowdiness and enthusiasm that couldn’t have been matched by any other.
— Pam Hogg, Patrick Benjamin
Regina Pyo by Patrick Benjamin

Regina Pyo by Patrick Benjamin

Regina Pyo by Patrick Benjamin

Regina Pyo by Patrick Benjamin